Panel 2

Resilience and natural disasters

Wednesday, 3rd of februay 2021
10.15 - 11.00

Resilience is increasingly present in natural disaster management programs and takes a new place in adaptation objectives of international aid. This panel will explore the theory and application of resilience approaches to natural disasters.

Brad Evans, Professor Brad Evans is a political philosopher, critical theorist and writer, whose work specialises on the problem of violence. The author of seventeen books and edited volumes, along with over a hundred academic and media articles, he currently holds a Chair in Political Violence & Aesthetics at the University of Bath, United Kingdom. Brad is founder/director of the Histories of Violence project that has a user base spanning 148 different countries. Alongside developing its educational initiatives, he has recently directed a global research project on the theme of "Disposable Life" to interrogate the meaning of mass violence in the 21st Century. Previous to this, his co-directed movie "Ten Years of Terror" (with Simon Critchley) received international acclaim, screening in the Solomon K. Guggenheim museum, New York during September 2011. Brad has been a visiting fellow at the Committee on Global Thought at Columbia University, New York (2013-14) and distinguished society fellow at Dartmouth College, New Hampshire (2017). Brad regularly writes and features on many prominent news sources such as Newsweek, the Guardian, Independent, BBC, LBC radio, World Financial Review, Al Jazeera, TruthOut, Counter-Punch and Social Europe. His projects have also been featured in many international outlets including NME, Business Standard, The Telegraph, The Indian Times, Pakistan Today, Hamilton Spectator,  CBS news, El Pais, and Art Forum to name a few

 

Gaélane Wolff is a teaching assistant and doctoral student at Global Studies Institute (GSI) and the Department of Political Science and International Relations of the University of Geneva. Gaélane holds a Master in Political Sciences and Globalisation from the University of Lausanne, Switzerland (2019), a Master in Political and Social Sciences from Science Po Strasbourg, France (2017), and a Bachelor in Sociology at the University of Strasbourg, France (2016). Her current research focuses on non-state actors (NSA) in disaster management. More specifically, she is studying how NSA, such as private foundations, justify their interventions following natural disasters and how disaster management becomes a political and economic issue.

 

Cédric Pfanner is a teaching assistant and doctoral student at Global Studies Institute (GSI) and the Department of Political Science and International Relations of the University of Geneva. Cédric holds a Master of Science in Security Studies from University College London (2015) and a Bachelor in International relations from University of Sussex (2014). His current research focuses on development and Sumatran issues. His thesis is about USAID’s aid delivery strategy and Non-Governmental Organizations, International Organizations and Companies.